Partnership Blog

Leadership: The Power of Local Organizing

June 29, 2012 -- Leslie Moody

Across the country, affiliates of the Partnership for Working Families are answering the question: Is any job a good job?

Our affiliates are exposing unfair policies and challenging our leaders to do better. In Seattle, Puget Sound Sage is exposing the double subsidy that the hotel and tourism industry enjoys, at the expense of taxpayer dollars and worker health and safety. In Los Angeles, LAANE is challenging the region to step up and clean up both job quality and neighborhood impact of the waste and recycling industries. In Denver, the Twin Cities and Seattle, to name a few, we are calling for racial and economic equity from transportation related investments and major transit buildouts. And in San Jose, Long Beach, Milwaukee and New Haven, we are organizing for city-wide reform of wages and job creation programs to truly meet the needs of working families.

Missed Opportunities

June 29, 2012 -- Ben Beach

Legal challenges to cities’ targeted hiring policies seem to be trending among some construction business groups.

These groups are out of touch.

Targeted hiring policies help those individuals and communities most hurt by the recession by creating new opportunities for real family-supporting careers. Washington DC has a city-wide unemployment rate of 9.9%, with much higher levels in areas of the city with concentrations of people of color. Cities facing similar situations have used these hiring policies to leverage their investment in construction into good jobs for folks who need an economic foothold. In Los Angeles, Oakland and Milwaukee, targeted hiring policies for public construction have meant hundreds of thousands of hours of prevailing wage construction work for disadvantaged residents of those cities.

What it Really Costs When Walmart Comes to Town

April 24, 2012 -- Louisa Abada

What it Really Costs When Walmart Comes to Town
by David Mielach

It's more bad news for Wal-Mart . After a New York Times story alleged that Wal-Mart bribed officials in Mexico to allow the company to open stores in that country, another new report reveals exactly how much it costs a community in dollars and cents when Walmart comes to town.

New York: ALIGN Challenges Walmart Expansion

March 30, 2012 -- Partnership for Working Families

It’s hard to imagine or believe that in a region like New York City having access to quality food is challenging. However, millions of New Yorkers live in “food deserts,” neighborhoods in which the absence of full-service supermarkets denies residents access both to affordable healthy food and to quality jobs with decent wages and benefits.

Beyond the Beltway

March 30, 2012 -- Leslie Moody

Waging campaigns across the country on behalf of working families, we are keenly aware that connecting national outrage with broad-based local movements is the key to change. Already in 2012 we have seen major victories where civic leaders are standing up and changing the way our cities do business.

New Haven: Call for Inclusive Prosperity

March 30, 2012 -- Partnership for Working Families

In recent years, New Haven has experienced a “renaissance” fueled by billions in public and private investment, aimed at attracting new affluent people and businesses, yielding high-end downtown development and the expansion of the education, research and medical sectors. This growth generates wealth for the biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and defense industries. However, not enough of that wealth stays in New Haven, where neighborhoods have not recovered from the thirty-year exodus of manufacturing jobs.

LAANE: Court Revives L.A. law protecting grocery workers

July 19, 2011 -- Louisa Abada

From the Los Angeles Times:

Laws passed by California cities to protect labor when businesses change hands received a boost Monday from the California Supreme Court, which revived a Los Angeles ordinance aimed at protecting grocery workers.

The state high court ruled 6 to 1 that the 2005 city measure, which lower courts had rejected, did not usurp state or federal law or violate constitutional guarantees by requiring new grocery store owners to keep existing employees for months after taking over ownership.

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