FRESC | June 17, 2011

Together, the Partnership for Working Families is building the next generation of leaders in our cities, leading change from the ground up.

That is exactly what is taking place in Denver.

You can see the power our movement has built in the recent results of the Denver municipal elections. FRESC and our allies will have four champions on City Council. Last month, Denver voters elected FRESC Program Director and Staff Attorney Robin Kniech as City Councilwoman At- Large, making her the first out LGBT elected official to serve in city government. On June 7th, in a run-off election District 1 voters elected Susan Shepherd, former Denver Area Labor Federation Political Director, to represent them. They both join former FRESC Executive Director and current City Council President Chris Nevitt and former union organizer Paul Lopez on Council. With these champions and several other allies on Council, we anticipate a majority on our 13 seat City Council. In addition, Mayor-elect Michael Hancock attended FRESC’s candidate forum and signed our pledge to prioritize good jobs and strong communities if elected mayor.

Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy | March 30, 2010

A recently released LAANE study found that the Century Corridor hotel living wage ordinance, combined with the successful negotiation of collective bargaining agreements at four LAX-adjacent hotels, will produce $23.9 million in economic benefits. In 2006, a coalition of community members, workers and clergy leaders joined together as the Coalition for a New Century in an effort to transform thousands of low-wage hotel jobs into family-sustaining jobs and to upgrade a lackluster L.A. tourism district that is often the first glimpse visitors have of the region.

Working Partnerships USA | March 30, 2010

While the national health reform debate rages on, a local program to cover the uninsured is now underway in Santa Clara County, California. On March 1, Working Partnerships USA, in partnership with the Santa Clara Family Health Plan and the Santa Clara Valley Health and Hospital System launched a new health care program for low-wage workers in small businesses called Healthy Workers. The program was developed by the same coalition that created the nation’s first universal health care program for children—the Children’s Health Initiative.

Allison Halprin Lovejoy | March 1, 2010

While the recession in Colorado seems to be on the mend, the state still faces job loss: Colorado's job shortfall was estimated by the Economic Policy Institute to be 195,191 jobs in November 2009. As promoting the creation of good jobs has long been central to FRESC's mission, the current recession and recovery efforts provide unique challenges and opportunities for our work.

Sebrina Owens-Wilson | March 1, 2010

The national spotlight is on the Coalition for Clean and Safe Ports' efforts to transform the broken port trucking system. On both coasts our partners have been key players in the fight to end the environmental degradation, health hazards and worker exploitation created by the port trucking industry.

Community Labor United | December 18, 2009

 On October 27, 2009 Massachusetts adopted a $1.4 billion plan that will

New CPI study finds construction training programs key to economic recovery

Center on Policy Initiatives | December 18, 2009

CPI released a report in September linking quality apprenticeship programs in the building trades to the future of California's green economy and economic recovery.

The report, Construction Apprenticeship Programs: Career Training for California's Recovery, demonstrates that apprenticeship training is most effective when run collaboratively by labor and management.

East Bay Alliance for a Sustainable... | December 18, 2009

Despite all of the assets and opportunities in Oakland, the city of nearly a half-million people has struggled with a high rate of crime and violence. In 2008, 128

FRESC | December 18, 2009

by Robin Kneich, FRESC: Good Jobs, Strong Communities

Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy | December 18, 2009

In a sweeping victory for working families, the Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously last month to make a long-overdue update to the city’s living wage ordinance. This update will raise the living wage in order to provide access to quality family healthcare for thousands of private sector LAX airline service workers. A year in the making, the vote amends the living wage to provide an increase to the healthcare allotment, meaning that families who have never had private healthcare will now be able to seek medical treatment and care.