Publications

Researching and producing publications that support our mission and our Partner groups' campaigns is a major component of the Partnership for Working Families' work. Below you will find links to full-text versions of all of our publications, as well as those of our Partner organizations.

Author: The Partnership for Working Families

Date: January 2014

Description:

The Partnership for Working Families, a national network of leading local advocacy organizations, supports innovative solutions to pressing economic and environmental problems.  We believe the power for real change is rooted in cities, where people live, work and organize.  Combining insightful research, cutting edge public policy, and broad alliance building, our affiliates collaborate on multi-city campaigns to transform industry practices, creating quality jobs, shared prosperity, and a healthy environment.

Author: The Partnership for Working Families

Date: October 2013

Description:

Partnership affiliates are bringing together strong coalitions of labor, faith, community and civil rights organizations, with the goal of leveraging transit investments to bring positive transformations to all communities.

Author: The Partnership for Working Families

Date: October 2013

Description:

Author: The Partnership for Working Families

Date: 2013

Description:

Coalitions of labor, community, faith, environmental, and housing organizations are creating national change through local policy campaigns that will deliver affordable housing to low-income families.

Author: The Partnership for Working Families

Date: July 2013

Description:

The Construction Careers Handbook is a guide for how to create construction careers programs that leverage public investment in public construction projects to create career opportunities for low-income communities. Our Construction Careers model implements strong job quality standards – like training and safety requirements, wage and benefits standards, and responsible contractor provisions – to ensure that public money is spent to create a high quality construction industry.

Author: The Partnership for Working Families

Date: July 2013

Description:

Our in-depth analysis of the 37 largest metropolitan areas in the country reveals low recycling rates, exploited workers, and an unaccountable industry.  Fortunately, there is a path to building low-impact, cost effective, and sustainable recycling systems in every region of the country.  Together these local transformations will deliver large-scale benefits for the environment, workers, communities, and the economy.  

Author: Puget Sound Sage

Date: March 2013

Description:

Below the Radar: How Sea-Tac Airport's substandard working conditions hurt our region and how other major airports changed course toward growth and prosperity shows how other airports have raised working standards and lifted up communities.

Author: The Partnership for Working Families

Date: January 2013

Description:

Communities across the county are winning environmental and economic justice for working families by improving the way they manage their trash.  Local governments, spurred on by worker organizations, environmentalist, and community groups, are using their power to insist on more recycling, better jobs, less pollution, and more accountability from the waste industry.  Read our campaign brochure to learn more!

Author: The Partnership for Working Families

Date: September, 2012

Description:

More than 20 of America’s leading organizations on work and the economy released a plan in September 2012 with 10 ways to rebuild America’s middle class. The new report details ten concrete proposals to strengthen the economy for the long term by creating good jobs and addressing the economic insecurity that has spread to millions of U.S. families.

Author: Puget Sound Sage

Date: May 2012

Description:

Transit Oriented Development that’s Healthy, Green and Just asks a basic question about Puget Sound’s new light rail system – how do we ensure this massive public investment benefits all families? In Southeast Seattle neighborhoods the light rail has already accelerated gentrification and may lead to displacement of many communities of color into the suburbs. It’s not just a lack of affordable housing, though. Low-wage jobs keep family incomes down as real estate prices rise, creating pressure to leave.

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