Publications

Researching and producing publications that support our mission and our Partner groups' campaigns is a major component of the Partnership for Working Families' work. Below you will find links to full-text versions of all of our publications, as well as those of our Partner organizations.

Author: The Partnership for Working Families

Date: March 2009

Description:

High-quality development is the key to transforming local economies and creating shared prosperity. The set of brief documents that comprises Community Benefits: Leveraging Partnerships for Successful Development identifies key lessons and best practices for creating effective community benefits partnerships with developers.

Author: The Partnership for Working Families

Date: December 2008

Description:

Local elected and appointed officials are critical allies in campaigns to ensure that development opens doors to opportunity and greater equality for urban residents. The important—often courageous—work of these officials is the basis for Community Benefits: Practical Tools for Proactive Development. This set of brief documents provides compelling examples of a broad range of community benefits tools, and offers suggestions for applying this development model in different types of cities.

Author: The Partnership for Working Families

Date: December 2008

Description:

As we prepare for new leadership in America, we can't let the opportunity to rebuild the middle class pass us by. Our federal policy agenda builds on Partner organizations’ work at the regional level to create pathways out of poverty through public and private investment, providing recommendations for increasing the supply of middle class jobs throughout the economy, in construction, service, retail, hospitality and logistics.

Author: Kathleen Mulligan-Hansel, Ph.D.

Date: July 2008

Description:

Making Development Work for Local Residents: Local Hire Programs and Implementation Strategies That Serve Low-Income Communities documents our movement's success in winning hundreds of new job opportunities for local residents.

Author: The Partnership for Working Families

Date: July 2008

Description:

Base Building: Organizing for Community Benefits in the Reuse of Closed Military Installations provides concrete information on organizing communities to get more benefits out of military base reuse. Base Building includes a detailed overview of the base reuse process and a discussion of the steps you need to take to attach community benefits principles to the base reuse plans in your community.

Author: The Partnership for Working Families

Date: June 2008

Description:

Rebuilding the Base reveals how communities are devastated by base closures and are often unable to replace the number or quality of jobs lost. The report also highlights ways that communities can better harness investment in public land at military bases to create good-paying jobs, affordable housing, and other community benefits.

Author: Benjamin S. Beach

Date: January 2008

Description:

This article seeks to describe the efforts of local groups to obtain their right to the city and achieve the goal of better neighborhoods while preventing community displacement. It focuses in particular on the legal strategies used and explores some of the lessons learned in local groups’ campaigns.

Author: The Partnership for Working Families, Center for Labor and Community Research

Date: January 2008

Description:

The data in this report shows that University of California workers in service and patient care positions earn significantly less than the livable wages other colleges and hospitals in the state pay, a fact that bodes ill for the 55 communities around the state in which these low-wage employees are concentrated. As one of the largest employers in California and one of the largest employers in the area surrounding each UC campus, the University has an important role to play in the future of these communities.

Author: Julian Gross

Date: January 2008

Description:

This article hopes to clarify the term CBA by proposing a definition that would limit its use to describing agreements that reflect the essential values of past CBAs: inclusiveness and accountability. Inclusiveness here refers to the process through which a CBA is negotiated, and accountability refers to the outcome—in particular whether CBA commitments are specific and legally enforceable.

Author: Sara Zimmerman

Date: November 2007

Description:

How does the development process work in New Orleans, and how can residents get involved to ensure that development is good for the whole community? This guide provides a basic introduction to a very complex topic. It explains the importance of understanding the development process and contains an over view of the different kinds of approvals and waivers that may be necessary to build a new development in New Orleans. By advocating for community needs during the approval and waiver process, coalitions can work to get these needs met.

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