Partnership Blog & News

Leslie Moody | June 29, 2012

Across the country, affiliates of the Partnership for Working Families are answering the question: Is any job a good job?

Our affiliates are exposing unfair policies and challenging our leaders to do better. In Seattle, Puget Sound Sage is exposing the double subsidy that the hotel and tourism industry enjoys, at the expense of taxpayer dollars and worker health and safety. In Los Angeles, LAANE is challenging the region to step up and clean up both job quality and neighborhood impact of the waste and recycling industries. In Denver, the Twin Cities and Seattle, to name a few, we are calling for racial and economic equity from transportation related investments and major transit buildouts. And in San Jose, Long Beach, Milwaukee and New Haven, we are organizing for city-wide reform of wages and job creation programs to truly meet the needs of working families.

Partnership for Working Families | April 26, 2012

At the Partnership for Working Families’ recent board meeting a new leader was elected to guide the board.  Nikki Fortunato Bas, executive director of EBASE was chosen to serve as the chair succeeding founding chair, Phaedra Ellis-Lamkins, formerly of Working Partnerships USA now CEO of Green For All.

Louisa Abada | April 24, 2012

What it Really Costs When Walmart Comes to Town
by David Mielach

It's more bad news for Wal-Mart . After a New York Times story alleged that Wal-Mart bribed officials in Mexico to allow the company to open stores in that country, another new report reveals exactly how much it costs a community in dollars and cents when Walmart comes to town.

Louisa Abada | April 18, 2012

Faith and Community Groups Rallying for Short Haul Truckers
by Bellamy Pailthorp

Partnership for Working Families | March 30, 2012

Los Angeles for a New Economy (LAANE) announced the appointment of Roxana Tynan as the new executive director, succeeding founder Madeline Janis, who moves into a newly created role as the organization’s first National Policy Director.  The Partnership welcomed the leadership transitions and new role for Tynan, who has been instrumental in the expansion of LAANE’s work and impact over the past decade.  

Partnership for Working Families | March 30, 2012

When government services shift to private contractors, taxpayers not only pay the bill, they risk losing once public information and the ability to oversee public services. To expose this disturbing national trend, In the Public Interest (ITPI), a project of the Partnership, released a report in mid-March during Sunshine Week 2012.

Partnership for Working Families | March 30, 2012

The Partnership congratulates four members of our network who were selected as winners of the REVERB spring grants program. An initiative of the Progressive Technology Project, REVERB is designed to help social justice organizations develop effective ways to align their organizing, communications, and technology efforts.

Partnership for Working Families | March 30, 2012

Now in its fifth year, the Good Jobs, Green Jobs Conference will hold regional conferences throughout the country in 2012. The Partnership is proud to sponsor the gatherings and supports our partners from Boston, Los Angles, San Jose, Philadelphia and Atlanta who are participating or have organized sessions at the regional events.

Leslie Moody | March 30, 2012

Waging campaigns across the country on behalf of working families, we are keenly aware that connecting national outrage with broad-based local movements is the key to change. Already in 2012 we have seen major victories where civic leaders are standing up and changing the way our cities do business.

Partnership for Working Families | March 30, 2012

In recent years, New Haven has experienced a “renaissance” fueled by billions in public and private investment, aimed at attracting new affluent people and businesses, yielding high-end downtown development and the expansion of the education, research and medical sectors. This growth generates wealth for the biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and defense industries. However, not enough of that wealth stays in New Haven, where neighborhoods have not recovered from the thirty-year exodus of manufacturing jobs.

Pages